Good Morning from Prince Edward Island,
 
I hope this finds you and yours safe and healthy.
 
Put the kettle on, let's have a cuppa. And thank you for allowing me into your home and schedule today.
 
The photo of the lobster boat with captain and crew on their way to set traps for the 2020 season. Photo by Katherine MacLaine.

Lobster fishermen set their traps from ports around Prince Edward Island Friday morning, after a two-week delay to the spring fishery. More photos and comments about the season here on the CBC story

And to celebrate the "setting" for the 2020 lobster season, we are giving away 10 pounds of freshly cooked lobsters. Unfortunately, we can only ship in Canada by overnight express. (sorry to our US cousins) To enter the contest, all you need to do is subscribe to our newsletter. If you already have, don't worry, you won't get the newsletter twice. But you do need to enter the contest. Click here to Enter: Win Ten Pounds of Lobster
 
I don't know about you, but there was a time during this isolation where I felt like I was grieving something. Now I have moved to a place of acceptance. It is what it is, and having a positive attitude makes it easier to deal with situations.
 

Over the long term, the future is decided by optimists. To be an optimist, you don't have to ignore all the many problems we create; you just have to imagine improving our capacity to solve problems." Kevin Kelly, the founder of WIRED magazine

Trevor McKendricks wrote the manifesto below in his Monday morning newsletter, How It Actually Works. 

Optimism2020: A Manifesto

1) Focus your time & attention on the things you can influence.
2) Do something today instead of daydreaming about tomorrow.
3) See problems as opportunities to learn, grow, and give meaning to our lives.
4) Keep promises to yourself, no matter how small. Telling yourself, you'll go on a walk and then doing it. Promising to call a friend, and doing it. Committing to your boss, you'll send that email, and doing it.
5) Have confidence you'll be able to figure out how to fix that thing that just broke.
6) Choose carefully the stories you tell yourself about who you are and what you're capable of.
7) Move fast. Most decisions can be reversed later.
8) Be you. Not because you're entitled to be heard but because there is some unique thing you have to offer, if you can find it.
9) Believe we can think, and build, and create ourselves out of any problem.
10) Internalize that the pie is not fixed, that life is not zero-sum.
11) Focus on why something could work instead of why it won't.
12) See yourself as part of the solution, not a victim of the problem.
13) Pay for the drive-thru order of the car behind you.
14) Recognize problems as temporary and specific, not permanent and expansive.
15) Believe problems are solvable. Maybe not right away, probably not easy, but that it can be done.
 
We are anticipating our sales to be down well over half this year. In preparation for this, we need to batten the hatches and weather the storm being wise with the use of our resources
 
Thank you for your supportive online orders this spring. The compliments about our product and service and the reviews you provide are a source of encouragement to all of us. Ghost hugs to all, and thank you from us.
 
The weeks at home have given time to organize "stuff." I read a few articles on living a simpler life by removing the unnecessary in it.
 
Such as this article out of the UK, The Ultimate Guide to Decluttering Your Home. It is thorough and helps one tackle the house room by room and ends with a 30-day challenge. It starts with a great quote.
 
"Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful." ~ William Morris
 

Another story out of the UK this morning. Graffiti artist Banksy made a painting of a Superhero Nurse and donated it to National Health Service.

Full story here in Artnet news.

 
I enjoyed reading This New York Times article as it adds insight into explaining the difference between Canadian and US Health Care Systems. Two Medical Systems, Two Pandemic Responses.
 

Paraprosdokians are figures of speech in which the latter part of a sentence or phrase is surprising. Here is a sample. 

In filling out an application, where it says, 'In case of emergency, notify:' I put 'DOCTOR.' 

Inspiration this week: Read an inspiring story this week about a 107-year-old artist who beat COVID-19. It was the second pandemic she survived. The story of artist Marliee.
 
Discovery this Week: The Newseum. The front pages of newspapers from all over the world updated daily. Neat stuff for news junkies. Check it out here.
 
Ever notice, they begin the evening news with 'Good Evening,' then proceed to tell you why it isn't.
 
 
I recognize that not everyone enjoys classical music. But if you watch this video for the complete performance, how can you not? The passion and the skill of all musicians and vocalists are treasures to listen to and to watch. 
 

Take care and all the best. Stay positive. 

 

With love from Prince Edward Island,

 
Bruce & Millie
Sunrise near Brackley Beach.
ps. 
They say you shouldn't go grocery shopping when you're hungry...
But I ran out of food a few days ago, and it's just getting worse!