Yellow-edged Giant Owl Butterfly

Posted on July 03, 2016 by Bruce MacNaughton

Caligo Atreus

 

Common Name: Yellow-edged Giant Owl

Scientific Name: Caligo Atreus

Wingspan: 140–160 mm

Location: Mexico to Peru

The Yellow-edged Giant Owl (Caligo atreus) is a butterfly of the Nymphalidae family. The larvae feed on Musa and Heliconia species and can be a pest for banana cultivation. Adults feed on juices of rotting fruit.

 

caligo atreus

 

------

Butterfly House Hours

Learn more about the Butterfly House: HERE

Special thanks to the following sources:

butterfliesandmoths.org

butterfliesofamerica.com

cambridgebutterfly.com

Wikipedia.org

 

White Angled-Sulphur Butterfly

Posted on July 03, 2016 by Bruce MacNaughton

White Angled-Sulphur Butterfly

 

Common Name: White Angled-Sulphur
Scientific Name: Anteos Clowned
Wingspan: 70–90 mm
Location: South America, Central America, & Southern North America

From the Pieridae family. They are strong fliers and noted for their migrations. They are the only white butterfly of this size, though could be mistaken for the rare white form of Anteos maerula Yellow-angled Sulphur. Males can be distinguished by the yellow patch on the forewing though this needs close views to be visible. It rarely settles with its wings open so pictures showing this are usually taken in flight on a speed of 1/1600 sec. On females this patch is blurred or absent.

 

White Angled-Sulphur Butterfly 2 

------

Butterfly House Hours

Learn more about the Butterfly House: HERE

Special thanks to the following sources:

butterfliesandmoths.org

butterfliesofamerica.com

cambridgebutterfly.com

Wikipedia.org

 

Variable Cracker Butterfly

Posted on July 03, 2016 by Bruce MacNaughton

Variable Cracker PEI Butterfly

Photo courtesy of Wikipedia 

 

Common Name: Variable Cracker
Scientific Name: Hamadryas Feronia
Wingspan: 7.3 - 8.3 cm
Location: Southern parts of the United States south to Brazil

The butterflies are commonly known as Crackers due to the ability of the males of several species to produce a sound similar to the crackling of bacon in a frying pan. The sound is produced as the butterflies take off, and is made by twanging a pair of spiny rods at the tip of the abdomen against bristles on the anal claspers. Only males can produce the sound, but both sexes can detect it - their wings have tiny hollow cells covered in membranes that vibrate in response to sound, and stimulate nerve endings. The purpose of the sound is not known. It may possibly deter competing males from occupying the same territory, or could act as a trigger to initiate the first response from a female during courtship. All Hamadryas species have a beautiful calico pattern on the upperside. In several species the ground colour is greyish and the pattern acts as an extremely effective camouflage against the bark of trees. In others, the wings are velvety black with a blue sheen and a pattern of bright blue spots.

 

Variable Cracker Butterfly PEI

Tiger Longwing Butterfly

Posted on July 03, 2016 by Bruce MacNaughton
Tiger Longwing Butterfly PEI

 

Common Name: Tiger Longwing

Scientific Name: Heliconius Hecale

Wingspan: 42-50 mm (1.65-2 in)

Location: Mexico to the Peruvian Amazon

All Heliconius species have long black wings bearing simple but striking patterns, typically featuring streaks or patches of red and cream, or blue and cream. Several including hecale have subspecies which mimic 'tiger complex' orange and black Ithomiines. Heliconius butterflies are characterised by having a very delicate fluttering flight, particularly when hovering around flowers. They commonly nectar at Hamelia, Lantana and Palicourea. Unlike other butterflies, Heliconius females feed on pollen as well as nectar.

Tiger Longwing Butterfly PEI

------

Butterfly House Hours

Learn more about the Butterfly House: HERE

Special thanks to the following sources:

butterfliesandmoths.org

butterfliesofamerica.com

cambridgebutterfly.com

Wikipedia.org

 

Tiger Leafwing Butterfly

Posted on July 03, 2016 by Bruce MacNaughton

Consul Fabius

Common Name: Tiger Leafwing
Scientific Name: Consul Fabius
Wingspan: 30–40 millimetres (1.2–1.6 in)
Location: Neotropics (South and Central America, the Mexican lowlands, the Caribbean islands, and southern Florida)

The upersides of the wings have a bright orange and black pattern, with two yellow bands across the angular forewings. The hindwings are tailed. This butterfly is part of a mimicry ring, as a matter of fact the cryptic undersides of the wings mimic a dead-leaf. This species is present in deciduous forest, rainforest, and cloud forest. It usually prefers the forest canopy, the banks of rivers and the forest edges, at elevations between sea level and about 1200 m.

 

Consul Fabius

 

------

Butterfly House Hours

Learn more about the Butterfly House: HERE

Special thanks to the following sources:

butterfliesandmoths.org

butterfliesofamerica.com

cambridgebutterfly.com

Wikipedia.org

 

Tarricina Longwing Butterfly

Posted on July 03, 2016 by Bruce MacNaughton

Tarricina Longwing Butterfly

 

Common Name: Tarricina Longwing

Scientific Name: Tithorea Tarricina

Wingspan: 75–80 millimetres (3.0–3.1 in)

Location: Mexico & Central and South America

The Tarricina Longwing is a species of butterflies belonging to the Nymphalidae family. The pattern of the wings is quite variable. Usually the dorsal sides of the forewings are black with white spots, while the hindwings are orange with black margins. The underside are similar, with many small white spots along the black margins. The antennae are black. The beautiful chrysalides are completely golden. It can be found at the edges of forested areas in lowlands and mountain slopes, at an elevation up to 1,500 metres (4,900 ft) above sea level.

 

Tarricina Longwing Butterfly PEI

 

------

Butterfly House Hours

Learn more about the Butterfly House: HERE

Special thanks to the following sources:

butterfliesandmoths.org

butterfliesofamerica.com

cambridgebutterfly.com

Wikipedia.org

 

Starry Night Cracker Butterfly

Posted on July 03, 2016 by Bruce MacNaughton

Starry Night Cracker Butterfly

 

Common Name: Starry Night Cracker

Scientific Name: Hamadryas Laodamia

Location: Mexico to the Amazon Basin

 

The butterflies are commonly known as Crackers due to the ability of the males of several species to produce a sound similar to the crackling of bacon in a frying pan. The sound is produced as the butterflies take off, and is made by twanging a pair of spiny rods at the tip of the abdomen against bristles on the anal claspers. Only males can produce the sound, but both sexes can detect it - their wings have tiny hollow cells covered in membranes that vibrate in response to sound, and stimulate nerve endings. The purpose of the sound is not known. It may possibly deter competing males from occupying the same territory, or could act as a trigger to initiate the first response from a female during courtship. All Hamadryas species have a beautiful calico pattern on the upperside. In several species, the ground colour is greyish and the pattern acts as an extremely effective camouflage against the bark of trees. In others, the wings are velvety black with a blue sheen and a pattern of bright blue spots.

 

------

Butterfly House Hours

Learn more about the Butterfly House: HERE

Special thanks to the following sources:

butterfliesandmoths.org

butterfliesofamerica.com

cambridgebutterfly.com

Wikipedia.org

 


Our Giveaway

Our Giveaway

Win a Trip to PEI!